Culture & History
 
  News & Events:  
 
Historical Events
  The Shoshone Conversion to Mormonism
  NW Shoshone Corinne Settlement
  Harvest & Diet Homesteading
  Clothing Washakie
  Shelter Washakeie School Day
  Customs World War II
  Fur Trappers Washakie Farm Sold
  Pioneer Movement Federal Recognition
 

Bear River Massacre

Massacre Site Saved
  Treaty of Box Elder References
  Promontory Point  
 
 

NW Shoshone & Fur Trappers

  As early as 1810, the fur trade between the American states and Europe brought trappers to Northwestern Shoshone territory. This began the So-so-goi’s first extended exposure to non-native culture.
In the early to mid 1800’s, the Northwestern Shoshone had adopted most of the Plains Culture, using the horse for mobility and the hunting of game. Chief Pocatello especially led his band on numerous hunts for buffalo in the Wyoming area. Pocatello also gained notoriety as a reckless and fearless marauder along the Oregon and California trails. The Wasatch Mountains provided small game for the Northwestern bands, but of even greater importance were the grass seeds and plant roots which grew in abundance in the valleys and along the hillsides of northern Utah before the cattle and sheep of the white man denuded these rich areas and left many of the Shoshone tribes in a starving condition and to suffer under the ignominy of being called "Digger Indians." Before white penetration, the Great Basin and Snake River Shoshone had been among the most ecologically efficient and well-adapted Indians of the American West.
 
 
  Brigham Tribal Office
707 N. Main Street
Brigham City, UT 84302
Phone: 800-310-8241
Local: 435.734.2286 | Fax: 435.734.0424
Pocatello Tribal Office
353 East Lander
Pocatello, ID 83201
Phone: 208-478-5712
Fax: 208.478.5713
 
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